News

10.26.2017
Bench Restoration more >
10.26.2017
Celebration of Victory Park Revitalization more >
10.26.2017
Cherokee Park: Bonnycastle Hill Restoration Project more >
10.26.2017
Volunteers Make Improvements at Chickasaw Park! more >

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Fred's Facts

Although captivated throughout his career by large, rural parks, during his later years Frederick Law Olmsted became intrigued by the social possibilities created by small urban spaces. Small neighborhood parks, playgrounds and squares might provide opportunities for respite from the congestion and noise of urban life.

Projects

Bridges of Cherokee Park RENOVATION

August 18, 2016

The Bridges of Cherokee Park

The bridges of Cherokee Park are part of what makes this Olmsted-designed park so beautiful. The ten limestone bridges have been well used and loved over the last 100 years, but it’s evident, after a complete study, that time has taken its toll.

In partnership with KYTC, Olmsted Parks Conservancy and Metro Parks & Recreation,  two of the historic bridges will be restored: Chenoweth Bridge(#5) and Mildred Ahrens Howard Memorial Bridge(#3).

The restoration of the Chenoweth Bridge, built in 1910,will start September 6 and be complete in approximately six weeks. Then work will begin on the 1920 Mildred Ahrens Bridge. It will be closed for four weeks. All work will be complete by November 15.

Please be aware that parts of Beargrass Creek Road will be closed during the restoration process. There are large signs indicating the detour route (we’ve also added the routes below), and you can also check olmstedparks.org for road closings and detour information.

**The area in the map highlighted red will be closed.

North Overlook Project Sign North Overlook Project Sign

Did you know?

The first bridges in Cherokee Park were a series of wooden structures named after Native American tribes and leaders such as Tecumseh, Hiawatha, and Blackhawk. Unfortunately, flooding kept destroying these bridges which led to the construction of the limestone bridges that we have today.