News

10.26.2017
Bench Restoration more >
10.26.2017
Celebration of Victory Park Revitalization more >
10.26.2017
Cherokee Park: Bonnycastle Hill Restoration Project more >
10.26.2017
Volunteers Make Improvements at Chickasaw Park! more >

Join Today

Become a member today and support the Frederick Law Olmsted Parks! Membership includes great benefits for you and your family. more >

Fred's Facts

“A man’s eyes cannot be as much occupied as they are in large cities by artificial things …without a harmful effect on his entire constitutional organization… Landscape was able to refresh and delight the eye and through the eye, the mind and the spirit.” -- Frederick Law Olmsted

Projects

Nurturing an Investment

June 05, 2013

DSC_9254

Now that planting season is over Olmsted Parks Conservancy is working hard to ensure the 2,000 trees and shrubs planted by staff and hardworking volunteers in the fall of 2012 and winter of 2013 in Cherokee and Seneca Parks survive to maturity.

Watering trees through the hot summer months is crucial to their survival. Instead of hauling water to each tree individually or using a less effective sprinkler system, the crew created an irrigation system using hoses to water many trees at once. A watering truck can pull up to the planting site and water all the newly planted tress saving hundreds of volunteer and staff hours over a year.

Trees are an investment that must be cared for several years after planting, and with proper care they will provide invaluable long term benefits to our parks and citizens.

Funding for the planting and on-going care of these trees was provided in part from two generous grants from MSD’s Urban Reforestation Program and LG&E and KU’s Plant for the Planet program.

Planting Helps Canopy!

Fall 2012, Olmsted Parks Conservancy embarked on the aggressive planting of hundreds of trees and shrubs in several areas of Cherokee and Seneca Parks immediately.  A $40,000 grant from MSD’s Urban Reforestation Program and a $5,000 grant from LG&E and KU’s Plant for the Planet program will fund the endeavor. The plantings are in areas where our staff  and volunteers have cleared invasive bush honeysuckle earlier this year.

“The best method to combat re-growth of invasive plants is to plant native species in these disturbed areas,” said Mimi Zinniel, President and CEO of Olmsted Parks Conservancy. “Seeds of native plants will start growing naturally, but we help nature along by planting more mature trees and shrubs.”

The grants allow the Conservancy to plant close to 2000 native trees and shrubs. Species were selected because of the general conditions of the area, geography and geology of the soil, and historic planting plans. Species include basswood, yellowwood, oak, and hickory trees. Shrubs include Viburnums and Spicebush.

Between invasive plant destruction and severe weather over the last several years, damage to Louisville’s tree canopy is noticeable. “These grants help the overall tree canopy for Louisville,” said Zinniel. “Louisville’s current tree canopy is low in comparison to other regional communities.”

Watch to see a planting done in Seneca Park!